Category Archives: Guidelines

And we all fall down…

A reintroduction…

For those of you curious as to what has been going on, things have been crazy in this household. It has been a period of five months now, and the family continues to work through a very complex recovery process. So, here’s the beginning to how I was injured, what resulted from the injury, and how we are pushing forward… back towards greatness.

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26 July 2015:

Much progress has been made with my team during this week’s training exercise. Everyone recieved some good training; several of the young leaders received some much needed mentorship; and we got to shoot the hell out of some machine guns—we were on fire and overall pleased with the outcome. It’s time to head home for an early birthday celebration, our boys are turning 8 and 11 this week!

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Happy early birthday, brudders! All they’ve wanted since we’ve moved here was a trampoline. (It took way too long to assemble and couldn’t be enjoyed that evening.)

The following morning at home, I was feeling great. I remember planning out the day in my head: do some yard-work, get some good breakfast, work on some fitness, and take the family out somewhere nice. Mission accomplished! That is, until the fitness part. Continue reading

Vindicated

When I thought about how I was going to share this story, I ran into a sort of dilemma. I wanted to make sure I used the most appropriate word to describe what my son had experienced, what he had accomplished, and how he was feeling. I have always had issues with writing, and have had to put constant effort in being able to express what I was thinking in my head. I know now, that it will take several words to capture this great moment in my son’s life. Really, it was a great moment for all of us. We thank you for stopping bye, and hope you enjoy! Continue reading

Establishing your family’s identity

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Without establishing your family’s identity, you deny yourself a platform for which to base your life decisions. This especially applies to your children.

How can you hold them accountable for things you haven’t taught them about?

Is it realistic to think that you can teach them everything?

How do we influence what they do when we’re not around?

Teaching your children about identity, and what it means to be them, gives them a path to follow – a left and right limit.

Check out Episode 2 of The Warrior Family Podcast to hear more on the topic.


 

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Outside Influence when raising a family: Why you should stand your ground

Hello Everyone! We have our first post suggestion from a friend at The Warrior Family. Remember, if you want us to cover something, just visit the homepage (thewarriorfamily.com), and click on the “What would you like to see” tab. This is a great topic so get your share buttons ready!

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Outside Influences

What I want to cover today is how we should deal with outside influences when it comes to raising your children, or just running your family. Yes, I say running your family for a very good reason, and I’ll cover that later.

The bottom line is this, no one starts off being a parent as an expert! You can read as many books as you want, attend as many classes, or workgroups, but the fact of the matter is, YOU JUST DON’T KNOW! Becoming a parent is easily one of the most exciting, yet fearful things that you will ever experience in your life. This fear, however, is a more healthy type of fear – the fear of failure.

So, the typical reaction for someone who is new, and about to start a family of their own is to go around asking others how exactly they should go about this new adventure (most times others insist on giving the advice any way). There is nothing wrong with this. Everyone should make some type of effort to prepare themselves for the unknowns of parenthood. However, it is important to understand that you, your family, and the way you go about raising them will never be perfect — and that isperfect! If you stress yourself out because your kid may be too loud at a restaurant, or you’re having trouble helping your kids understand fractions (…I hated fractions…), GOOD! This stress will, or shouldforce you to react and make a change.

The key component to all of this is that you need to buckle down, and decide what it is that you want your family to be – what will be your families identity. The reason this is so important is because it will provide you with a foundation for you to operate on. Let me give you all some tips on how we go about this: Continue reading

Life’s Mountains : Capitalizing on Achievements to Instill Life Habits

As parents all we want is for our kids to be successful, yet we often don’t spend enough time teaching them how  exactly to achieve this success. With our busy work schedules, dirty houses, crying babies, dirty laundry, and piles of bills to pay, it’s easy for us to miss out on several key opportunities to teach our kids some very important life lessons on how they can become successful.

Since time for parents is often limited, special emphasis should be placed on the quality of the time spent with our kids. Not only what we are physically doing during that time, but the lessons that we teach them during that time as well. One thing that I learned early on in life is that when the time is right, you strike without warning – trust your gut! This is the mentality that led me to marrying my wife of over 10 years! So, I’d like to share with you all an opportunity I capitalized on to teach my son about how to achieve continued success. Continue reading

Quit Stalling! : Re-define success and regain your momentum

“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” – Chinese Proverb

When we were growing up, we were always asked “What do you wanna be when you’re an adult?” A fireman, an astronaut, the President, an Army guy…we would come up with the most amazing dreams. We could easily visualize ourselves achieving these great feats when we were children. So, let me ask you, what are you now?

If your answer is different from what you remember dreaming about as a kid, this could be due to several reasons:

  1. Your interests have changed
  2. You don’t believe you can do it
  3. You let others talk you out of it
  4. You are no longer your priority
  5. You gave up

Yeah, I know that sounds rough, but it’s ok. I wanted to share these thoughts because, for a while, I felt the same way too. However, from spending so much time helping others grow, I realized that I needed to take a step back and give myself a hard look. I had to ask myself again, “What do I want to be when I grow up?” When I realized that I was no longer moving toward any of my previous goals, or toward any goal for that matter, I had to ask myself, why? After some hard self assessment, these are some of the answers I came up with, and at first glance, it seems I have failed to reach any level of success – but I was wrong.

Friends, for quite some time I have spent hours studying, analyzing, and discussing with others, what exactly qualifies as success? How do we get there? Here are some things that I have learned that have fired me up, and have put me back on the right path.

First, no great person achieved anything by merely thinking about it. Nor, is there such a thing as an overnight success. As with everything great in life, hard work is the answer. I remember telling my son that we should never be hungry for immediate gratification for what we do. The greatest achievements in life are earned through years of dedication, and devotion to ones passion. I used the example given by Thomas A. Edison when discussing the amount of time it took him to invent the light bulb. He stated,

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Would we say that he was unsuccessful?

Author, and former power lifter Chris Moore uses music to further explain this. In one of his podcast’s (check out the Barbell Buddha Podcast), he mentions that we often spend too much time focusing on the ending, the point of gratification. This would be the same as attending a concert, or listening to a song, just to hear the ending – it makes no sense! It is the sweet melodies, the notes, the rises and falls that make music beautiful, and exciting. Why would we not look at life this way? My interpretation of success made it easy for me so feel as if I had failed, when in fact, I had only scratched the surface. When I would see this failure, the desire to quit entirely would often become overwhelming, and I know this is the case for many others.

So, why do we fail to reach success?

One of the main reasons we fail to reach success is because, as I stated before, we treat it as an ending, instead of a process. Just because I’m not the President of my company today, doesn’t mean I won’t be there eventually. As long as I live each individual day to the fullest, keep the end in mind, but work and live in the present, I have succeeded that day! This, my friends, is progress.

Like I mentioned in our last post, you climb a mountain one step at a time. If you try to look up at the tippy-top the entire time, you can grow dizzy, and faint; but if you focus, and take one hard step at a time, you will eventually get to the top. Times will get hard, and you may lose ground from time to time, this is OK. Remember,

“Yesterday ended last night” – John C. Maxwell

When you get a chance at a new day, tackle it with more intensity, and focus – that will make it a successful day. In the future, those days will be viewed by others as your lifetime, so treat each one as if it were special.


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Mental Coaching: 3 tips to help your child work through those tough training days

A common theme amongst American families is the years of peewee football, wrestling, soccer, and baseball that we expose our children to. A parent wants nothing more than for their children to find exactly what makes them happy, so that they can have hobbies to break the monotony of school, chores, and homework. However, often times the young athletes get very passionate about their sport, and tend to feel pressured to perform well for themselves, or their parents. Continue reading